becoming--batman asked: what do you think korra's fighting style is? it seems to differ from the other benders. i dont see it as fluid as other water benders so i was wondering if she had a unique style

In my humble opinion Korra’s fighting style is just that Korra’s fighting style. Unlike Aang who mastered Airbending before moving on to train in the other bending arts, Korra was able to bend three elements from a very early age (I believe she was 4 years old when we first see her). Her style has from that time has been blend of the bending arts. From my own personal experience in martial arts, when learning an additional art (cross training) it will have an effect the way you fight, if not stylistically your approach will change. Even if you learn just one art your own personal style will develop from your own personal preferences, physical ability and body type. One thing that I have often thought when watching Korra fight is that stylistically she does favour Firebending (Northern Shaolin), this can even be seen at times when she is bending the other elements. I hope that answers your question.

sifu-kisu:

avatarfightingforms:

The tenth and final movement of the Dancing Dragon form. This movement uses a Bow stance and a double front punch. This movement is the most discussed movement of the Dancing Dragon form due similarity with Dragon Ball Z’s Fusion Dance. Whether this movement is or is not be a homage to DBZ is irrelevant to me as the movement is a perfectly valid martial movement and is found in many martial arts albeit in varying forms. In Xingyiquan the movement is known as the cannon fist and it associated with the fire element. I was taught this movement by the name Double Dragons fight for Pearl.    
The non Avatar pictures can be found here and here.


This technique arises from the double handed strike found in Northern Shaolim form number 7. Moi Fa Kuen “the plum flower fist” as well as a similar strike in the Hung Ga tiger and crane practice form. Please understand that there is not one frame in our show related to anything from Dragon Ball or any other show that you’d ever seen…. 

Please try not to speak with authority on systems that you know nothing about?

 
Form No. 7 – Breaking the Ambush (Plum Flower Fists)
 
An ambush, where one is surrounded, is a real life situation.  This set prepares the student with combinations to survive the ordeal.  The method of how to ‘open up’ the circle of attackers and then demolish them one-by-one is the main theme of the set.  Many techniques in the set involve simultaneous striking in multiple directions at different opponents.  Quick and sudden changes in attack directions are the skills to be developed.  The set is called the Plum Flower Fist for the shape of the multi-directional travel of the form, which looks like a flower if viewed down from high up.

Here’s a link to my son performing Moi Fa Kuen. http://youtu.be/7VSaIGDd8jg

Thank you Sifu Kisu for your clarification and the additional information.

sifu-kisu:

avatarfightingforms:

The tenth and final movement of the Dancing Dragon form. This movement uses a Bow stance and a double front punch. This movement is the most discussed movement of the Dancing Dragon form due similarity with Dragon Ball Z’s Fusion Dance. Whether this movement is or is not be a homage to DBZ is irrelevant to me as the movement is a perfectly valid martial movement and is found in many martial arts albeit in varying forms. In Xingyiquan the movement is known as the cannon fist and it associated with the fire element. I was taught this movement by the name Double Dragons fight for Pearl.    

The non Avatar pictures can be found here and here.

This technique arises from the double handed strike found in Northern Shaolim form number 7. Moi Fa Kuen “the plum flower fist” as well as a similar strike in the Hung Ga tiger and crane practice form. Please understand that there is not one frame in our show related to anything from Dragon Ball or any other show that you’d ever seen…. Please try not to speak with authority on systems that you know nothing about? Form No. 7 – Breaking the Ambush (Plum Flower Fists) An ambush, where one is surrounded, is a real life situation. This set prepares the student with combinations to survive the ordeal. The method of how to ‘open up’ the circle of attackers and then demolish them one-by-one is the main theme of the set. Many techniques in the set involve simultaneous striking in multiple directions at different opponents. Quick and sudden changes in attack directions are the skills to be developed. The set is called the Plum Flower Fist for the shape of the multi-directional travel of the form, which looks like a flower if viewed down from high up. Here’s a link to my son performing Moi Fa Kuen.
http://youtu.be/7VSaIGDd8jg

Thank you Sifu Kisu for your clarification and the additional information.

(Reblogged from sifu-kisu)
sifu-kisu:

avatarfightingforms:

The second movement of the Dancing Dragon form. This posture utilises a “Drop stance”. The drop stance is primary used to evade high and jumping kicks, however it can be used offensively with the front leg attacking the opponent’s supporting leg.
The non Avatar picture can be found here.




The reference to the fellow pictured below is incorrect as is his posture and essence. That fellow is a Modern Wushu practitioner, in essence a dancer with no concept of manifest energy. This is NOT a DROP STANCE it is called THE SHOOTING ARROW STANCE taken from traditional Northern Shaolim.

Thank you Sifu Kisu for the correction.

sifu-kisu:

avatarfightingforms:

The second movement of the Dancing Dragon form. This posture utilises a “Drop stance”. The drop stance is primary used to evade high and jumping kicks, however it can be used offensively with the front leg attacking the opponent’s supporting leg.

The non Avatar picture can be found here.

The reference to the fellow pictured below is incorrect as is his posture and essence. That fellow is a Modern Wushu practitioner, in essence a dancer with no concept of manifest energy. This is NOT a DROP STANCE it is called THE SHOOTING ARROW STANCE taken from traditional Northern Shaolim.

Thank you Sifu Kisu for the correction.

(Reblogged from sifu-kisu)
sifu-kisu:

avatarfightingforms:

The Seventh movement of the Dancing Dragon form. This movement uses a Bow stance with a double Spear hand. It may be worth noting that when Zuko performs the Dancing Dragon form with the Dragons he forms Sword finger hands during the transition between the sixth movement and seventh movement. The Sword finger hand is used for Lightening generation and redirection. This may indicate that Zuko is thinking about the possible applications of the form. 
The non Avatar images can be found here and here.


The dragon dance was a series of moves that I created in ad-lib based on movement essences from the Northern Shaolim training forms Limpo and Tan Tui. They including the techniques of “filing”, “drilling”, “over turning”, “Pak Quar” (scissor hands), the secret sword hand (used by Azula for fire lightning) plus a few personal on the spot innovations all my own. All of the martial movements that you see in the Avatar series were created and drawn frame by frame using video reference performed by Sifu Kisu and his student Bryan Konetzco. These movements are borrowed from the traditional curriculum of the Los Angeles Northern Shaolim Kung Fu association headed by Great Master Ken Hui. Toph’s  moves come exclusive from Sifu Manny and his Son Scott. Any other references to relations with other martial styles and associations should be avoided.

Thank you Sifu Kisu for the information

sifu-kisu:

avatarfightingforms:

The Seventh movement of the Dancing Dragon form. This movement uses a Bow stance with a double Spear hand. It may be worth noting that when Zuko performs the Dancing Dragon form with the Dragons he forms Sword finger hands during the transition between the sixth movement and seventh movement. The Sword finger hand is used for Lightening generation and redirection. This may indicate that Zuko is thinking about the possible applications of the form. 

The non Avatar images can be found here and here.

The dragon dance was a series of moves that I created in ad-lib based on movement essences from the Northern Shaolim training forms Limpo and Tan Tui. They including the techniques of “filing”, “drilling”, “over turning”, “Pak Quar” (scissor hands), the secret sword hand (used by Azula for fire lightning) plus a few personal on the spot innovations all my own. All of the martial movements that you see in the Avatar series were created and drawn frame by frame using video reference performed by Sifu Kisu and his student Bryan Konetzco. These movements are borrowed from the traditional curriculum of the Los Angeles Northern Shaolim Kung Fu association headed by Great Master Ken Hui. Toph’s moves come exclusive from Sifu Manny and his Son Scott. Any other references to relations with other martial styles and associations should be avoided.

Thank you Sifu Kisu for the information

(Reblogged from sifu-kisu)
Here Aang is training with a Stone Lock (石锁 Shi Sou) which is a traditional piece of training equipment and was found in many Chinese martial arts but is rarely seen nowadays. Training begins with swinging and thrusting the lock and then to simple throws onto increasingly complex throwing patterns. Many of the exercises could be performed using Kettlebells or even dumbbells.

Here Aang is training with a Stone Lock (石锁 Shi Sou) which is a traditional piece of training equipment and was found in many Chinese martial arts but is rarely seen nowadays. Training begins with swinging and thrusting the lock and then to simple throws onto increasingly complex throwing patterns. Many of the exercises could be performed using Kettlebells or even dumbbells.

These images have been doing the rounds for a while now with the tag ‘TOPH IS ROLLING OVER IN HER GRAVE’. However would Toph really be rolling in her grave?

I am currently learning a new martial art and these images came into my mind while I was learning new stances and footwork. When learning a new style it is crucial to get the fundamentals correct because they underpin all later techniques.

Toph knows that Aang’s mindset is completely different to that of an Earthbender. Earth is the “natural opposite” to Air. Aang’s “avoid and evade” tactics are not going to be of use “Rock is a stubborn element. If you’re going to move it, you’ve got to be like a rock yourself.” Toph (bitter Work). When Aang fails to move the rock and suggests “Maybe there’s another way. What if I came at the boulder from a different angle?” Toph strongly reprimands Aang “No, that’s the problem. You’ve got to stop thinking like an Airbender. There’s no different angle, no clever solution, no trickity trick that’s going to move that rock. You’ve got to face it head on.”

It is worth noticing that when Toph is teaching Aang she uses a classical Earthbending (Hung Gar) stance as opposed to her own stances that tend to be much higher. Which reminds a quote by Master Gichin Funakoshi (the founder of Shotokan Karate) “Beginners must master low stances and posture, natural body positions are for the advanced.”
Talking of higher stances brings me round nice to Bolin’s approach.

Bolin’s fighting style has been strongly influenced by the sport of Pro-bending. Pro-bending is governed by rules which restrict the Earthbender to bending regulation rock discs. This limits the Earthbender both offensively and defensively, the Earthbender is unable to employ the classic tactic of enduring the enemies’ attack until the time is right to attack. Although we do see Bolin occasionally using a rock disc as shield during the matches, the protection offered is very limited. The Earthbender has to employ a more evasive tactic otherwise he is going to be a “sitting turtle-duck” especially in a two or three to one barrage. We have no knowledge of Bolin’s training but his style is so similar to Mako’s that he was either trained by or with Mako. It is worth noting that both brothers use demonstrate more classical bending techniques outside of the Pro-bending arena. There is no doubt in my mind that the brothers would have also learnt bits and pieces from the Triple Threat Triad which I am sure would not have been particularly orthodox either. How you train is how you fight so it would be only natural for the brothers to blend the classical and Pro bending styles.

True mastery of a bending art is achieved when the bender is able to adapt to different circumstances and environments. An accomplished bender knows when to bend and break the rules taught to the beginner. Toph did this in her battle with the wrestlers of the Earth Rumble VI using evasive movements to her advantage. Toph would have also adapted her style to fit in with modern city life, as you can’t go throwing big blocks of rock about in the city. I think Toph would have enjoyed Pro-bending for what it is, a sport.

(Reblogged from ladycatsa)

sifu-kisu:

Hung Ga Horse Stance

(Reblogged from sifu-kisu)

An excellent tutorial from Sihing Kuttel which can be applied to Zuko’s Twin Swords or Jet’s Hook Swords or even the Lieutenant’s electrified kali sticks. For more double weapon tutorials click on the links here, here,, here and here.

"Keep in mind, these are dual swords. Two halves of a single weapon. Don’t think of them as separate, because they’re not. They’re just two different parts of the same whole."

Zuko (Zuko Alone)

Can’t wait to see Korra working the pads!

(Reblogged from bryankonietzko)

handsaretobuild asked: Greetings Sifu Kisu, I believe that Azula's movements are based on Chaquan, was the demonstration she performed for Fire Lord Azulon based on a particular form? Also could you post some good examples of the forms lin bo and Tan toy on your blog. I am very interested in the forms (taolu) seen in the show and any more information you could give me would be very much appreciated. Thank you Sifu and have a blessed day.

sifu-kisu:

Hi;

the Azula demo before Ozai was a fragment of Cha Kuen form number 4 (the slippery fork). Zuko performed the beginning of Northern Shaolim form number 6, tun Da (the short strike.)

I have a few videos up on my YouTube page as “Lokhopkuen” but don’t expect too much. My teacher is old fashioned and likes us to keep the meat of our gung fu to our selves.

You can search YouTube for northern shaolin, bei Shaolin and Wing Lam kung fu for some of the northern shaolin forms done in their flavor. Also search Cha Chaun, Cha Kuen, Wan Lai Sheng, Natural fist school, chin woo etc.

Kind regards

(Reblogged from sifu-kisu)