sifu-kisu:

on-cloud-eight:

The Airbending moves that Korra teaches Opal are the same ones that Aang and Katara did in “The Headband”

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To be technical the sequence with Aang and Katara is single palm change from the swimming dragon Bagua. The sequence with Opal and Katara is the Double Palm change from the same practice set. I just think it’s so cool to see these movements taken from reference that I had generated in animation!

Thanks for the additional information sifu-kisu

(Reblogged from sifu-kisu)

Thank you Sifu Kisu for allowing me to use your Baguazhang pictures.

For a while I’ve been thinking about writing a blog covering the basics of Baguazhang as taught to me by a former work colleague. What struck me most about Baguazhang was that unlike most martial arts I have tried where the first things you learn are how to form a fist and punch, Baguazhang training begins with footwork (walking). In Baguazhang  maneuverability and mobility are seen as the key to success in combat. My friend used to tell me that a skilled practitioner of Baguazhang can defeat their opponent with footwork alone. While surfing the net I found these articles on Baguazhang that do a much better job than I could do.

Circle walking

SIngle palm change

sifu-kisu:

Bagua Jurng A graphic tool for training the circle walk.

(Reblogged from sifu-kisu)

on-cloud-eight:

The Airbending moves that Korra teaches Opal are the same ones that Aang and Katara did in “The Headband”

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(Reblogged from on-cloud-eight)

The fight within the dance!

Aang and Katara’s dance begins with Baguazhang’s circle walking with a couple of palm changes and then goes on to include movements very similar to those found in capoeira.

(Reblogged from avatarparallels)

angrytaichiguy:

Let’s face it - weapons and martial arts go together like Godzilla and demolition.

Swords are the movie stars of the weapons world. People inherently find swords of all kinds awesome. And they are. But there are so many other equally awesome weapons out there that get little love.

Way down at the bottom of the cool list is the fan. The poor, lonely fan. Most people picture fans as a novelty, something that has no purpose in the land of air conditioning. But did you know the fan has a history of bad-assery?

Take for instance the legend of the flying guillotine. If you’re thinking to yourself, “Self, haven’t I heard of a movie with that name?” You would be correct (and possibly crazy, stop talking to yourself in public!) You see, back in the day fans weren’t always made of light materials. Instead of the ribs you see in modern kung fu fans, they used to be sections of overlapping sharpened metal (a la Mortal Kombat fame.) Assassin’s used to tie ropes around the bottom of a fan, hide the fan in their sleeves, and fling out the metal fan at their target’s neck. Thus, the legend of the flying guillotine was born.

Not that this is the only way a fan is useful. Can think of a fan as a stick weapon. Great for pressure points and striking the more sensitive areas of the body. In the video you can see how the fan is used as an extension of the hands, generating better leverage for striking and redirecting incoming blows.

So give the fan some love. Besides, know what a sword can’t do? Cool you off after a workout! Best. Application. Ever.

(Reblogged from angrytaichiguy)
In a previous blog I described the concept of the centerline and I thought I would post a picture to clarify what I mean.
I also include a quote from an article discussing the fighting stance of Baguazhang
'However, when training specifically for fighting, one must learn to “Close the Door” by modifying the body posture and stance to shut off an opponent’s access to one’s centerline, both above and below the waist.  “Closing the Door” protects the body’s "Center Gate" (Chung Men), and covers all possible paths through which an opponent can attack.’
The non-Avatar pictures can be found here, here and here.

In a previous blog I described the concept of the centerline and I thought I would post a picture to clarify what I mean.

I also include a quote from an article discussing the fighting stance of Baguazhang

'However, when training specifically for fighting, one must learn to “Close the Door” by modifying the body posture and stance to shut off an opponent’s access to one’s centerline, both above and below the waist.  “Closing the Door” protects the body’s "Center Gate" (Chung Men), and covers all possible paths through which an opponent can attack.’

The non-Avatar pictures can be found here, here and here.

the-weapons-of-atla-lok:

With all these new airbenders coming into play, I wonder if any new styles of bending are going to arise. I want to see the boundaries pushed as what is possible with airbending. I mean, not everyone can learn from Tenzin; some will learn on their own and develop new forms and fighting styles

(Reblogged from the-weapons-of-atla-lok)

Guest Blog: Tui shou (Push hands) and its connection to Avatar the Last Airbender by Sihing Kuttel

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(Editor’s note: look familiar? Iroh and Zuko are seen doing a similar movement in “Bitter Work”)

When we look at tui shou or push hands and its connection to Avatar the Last Airbender it is important that we first look to the root of push hands and then uncover the many concepts that lie within. Push hands is a type of sparring for internal arts such as Taiji Chuan and Bagua Zhang, so we can already see that there is a connection to water and air bending tribes. However we can safely lean a little more towards water bending as Taiji concepts like yin and yang, empty and full and circular movement correlate directly into push hands technique. In push hands the goal is to connect with the opponent, find their balance, read their energy and unsettle it with the lightest of effort. Success in push hands goes beyond quick shoving and wrestling and actually relies on body connection to use leverage and redirect an oncoming attack.
A push hands adept will remain relaxed and unmoved, yet will disturb their opponent’s balance with ease, almost as if controlling the other person through touch and correct usage of energy. Not only are they mentally two steps ahead but physically as well, setting their opponent up by pressing or pulling in one direction and when the opponent resists, it results in overcorrection, to which the adept responds by reversing their direction of attack thus moving the opponent off balance and even sometimes to the ground.

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Since push hands is based on Taiji principles, it cannot be considered a separate type of bending. Push hands is a facet of Taiji, thus it is a facet of water bending. Infact, we can go as far to say that it is a sub-style or an extension of water bending… that’s right, you guessed it, blood bending.
When one pushes hands with a true master it is like trying to move a cloud and a mountain simultaneously. If one charges in forcefully they will find nothing to connect to, like trying to grapple with the wind. Or if a connection is allowed one will find a master as immovable as a boulder, able to withstand and rebuff even the hardest of pushes with no noticeable effort. Yet when the master pushes it’s like one solid wave crashing upon you, even when you redirect and think you have the upper hand, it is merely a set up and you are duped into pushing yourself over. When the master connects, you have already lost. Your qi or energy (not as in spiritual, but more like kinetic) is read, the master latches on and disrupts you instantly. Blood bending will stop your blood and make you a living puppet, the only difference is push hands won’t stop your blood…

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(Editor’s note: A big thank you to Sihing Kuttel for this blog and to Angry Tai Chi Guy for his contributions)